October 19, 2021

Charity, love and a prenup cover a multitude of sins...


THE FAMOUS BIBLICAL QUOTE:

“And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins.”  
      
Saint Peter (c. 1 BC-c. 67 AD)
       Galilean-born Apostle of Jesus and early Christian leader
       His famous words in
I Peter 4:8, as translated in the King James Bible. Most later version of the Bible use the word love in place of charity.
       Chapter 4, Verse 8 of the
“First Epistle of Peter” (usually referred to as I Peter 4:8) is the origin of the sayings “charity covers a multitude of sins” and “love covers a multitude of sins.” These reflect two different translations of a word originally written in Greek by Peter. Although most familiar Bible quotes are from the King James version, “love covers a multitude of sins” has become the more commonly heard version.
       Peter actually used the Greek word agape for the thing that covers a multitude of sins. In the early Catholic Church’s Vulgate Bible and in the King James Version, agape was translated as charity. In later versions, it was translated as love. But in early Christian theology it didn’t quite mean what we now think of when we use either of those words. Agape refers to a more profound concept that can’t easily be translated into a single English word. It means a feeling of charitable compassion, empathy and non-romantic love toward other people, like the love God and Jesus Christ are said to have for mankind; a higher love that can look past and forgive — and thus “cover” and accept — other people’s faults and transgressions. 
       The famed Bible quote was not intended to mean that if someone gives enough alms to the poor or donates enough money to charities it will atone for or “cover up” their sins and let them get past St. Peter into the Pearly Gates of Heaven. Nonetheless, in common use, variations of the saying “charity covers a multitude of sins” are often used to suggest that doing or having a certain thing will hide or excuse something else.


THE #TRUMPBIBLE VERSION:

“Love covers a multitude of sins. Sure. But you’d be nuts not to get a prenup. I mean, c’mon. #TrumpBible.” 
       Eric Metaxas
       Pastor, author and radio show host
       One of Metaxas's suggested additions to the funny faux Donald Trump quotes featured on the #TrumpBible Twitter page, which mocks Trump’s claim to be a Christian (and Trump in general). Illustration by Jordan Awan.


MOTHER TERESA’S POIGNANT VERSION:

“The conditions under which the leper families live are terrible...Sometimes the pain is so great that I feel as if everything will break. The smile is a big cloak which covers a multitude of pains.”
      
Mother Teresa (1910-1997)
       Albanian-born Catholic nun known for her humanitarian efforts in India
      
In a letter quoted in the book Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light: the Private Writings of the Saint of Calcutta (2007), edited by Brian Kolodiejchuk


OSCAR WILDE’S SOCIALIST VARIATION:

“The proper aim is to try and reconstruct society on such a basis that poverty will be impossible... Charity creates a multitude of sins. There is also this to be said. It is immoral to use private property in order to alleviate the horrible evils that result from the institution of private property. It is both immoral and unfair.”
      
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
       Irish playwright, poet, social critic and wit
       In his essay
“The Soul of Man Under Socialism” (1891)


CARL SAGAN’S OBSERVATION:

“The word ‘god’ is used to cover a vast multitude of mutually exclusive ideas. And the distinctions are, I believe in some cases, intentionally fuzzed so that no one will be offended that people are not talking about their god.”
      
Carl Sagan (1934-1996)
       American astronomer, astrophysicist, cosmologist and author 
       Remark in a lecture included in the book
The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God (2007)


CAPTAIN KIRK’S QUIP:

“That helmet covers a multitude of sins.”
      
Captain James T. Kirk (actor William Shatner) 
       Kirk makes this joking remark
to Spock (Leonard Nimoy) in the Star Trek episode “Patterns of Force” (Season 2, Episode 21). He’s referring to the helmet Spock puts on during their visit to a planet run by a Nazi-inspired government. The helmet covers Spock’s pointed Vulcan ears, thus helping to hide the fact that he is an alien.

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August 29, 2021

“The power of Christ compels you!” … and the power of BTS ...

       

FAMOUS SATAN-BUSTING MOVIE QUOTE:

“The power of Christ compels you!”
       The words from the Catholic “Rite of Exorcism” repeated multiple times by the characters Father Merrin and Father Damien (played by Max von Sydow and Jason Miller) in the movie The Exorcist (1973), as they try to exorcize the demon that possesses
Regan MacNeil (Linda Blair). 
       You can watch the scene where they chant the line as Regan floats in the air above her bed by clicking
this link or the image at left.
       It still gives me goosebumps. 

Catholic exorcisim rite

THE ORIGIN OF THE FAMED LINE:

“I adjure you, ancient serpent...to depart from this servant of God, whom almighty God has made in His image. Yield, therefore, yield not to my own person but to the minister of Christ. For it is the power of Christ that compels you.” 
       Part of the official Catholic “Rite of Exorcism”
       The instructions for the rite explain that it should be used get rid of a demon in “the person possessed.” It adds the helpful tip that the afflicted party “should be bound if there is any danger.”



       

THE SOUTH KOREAN BOY BAND VARIATION:

“Power of BTS Compels You: These BTS-Backed Phones Broke Pre-Order Records for Samsung.”  
       Headline of an August 2021 Rolling Stone magazine article about the surge in sales of Samsung mobile phones caused by the brand's use of the South Korean boy band BTS in promotional videos.

the power of Patty compels you       

THE GHOSTBUSTING VERSION:

“The power of Patty compels you!” 
       Line shouted by character Patty Tolan (played by Leslie Jones) in the
the 2016 version of the movie Ghostbusters.
       Patty yells this while slapping the face of her friend Abby Yates (actress Melissa McCarthy), in an attempt to exorcize the ghost that possesses Abby’s body.
       It works. After the ghost leaves, Abby quips: “Ow! That’s gonna leave a mark.”

Jesus Christ Vampire Hunter DVD

THE HOLY VAMPIRE BUSTER’S VERSION:

“The Power of Christ Impales You!” 
       Ad tagline for the indie comedy-horror movie Jesus Christ Vampire Hunter (2001)

Robin Williams Weapons of Self Destruction

ROBIN’S DEMON TURD:

“The drugs make you so constipated, I thought they were gonna have to bring in a priest to do a f**king exorcism. ‘Demon turd, fall from his ass! The power of fiber compels you! The power of fiber compels you!’
       Robin Williams (1951-2014)
       American comedian and actor
       Riffing on the constipation caused by the pain medication he took after heart surgery, in his 2009 HBO special Weapons of Self-Destruction.

The Power of Kanye Compels You 2

THE WEST GRAFFITI QUOTE:

“THE POWER OF KANYE COMPELS YOU”
       These words, spray-painted on a brick wall, gained attention when a photo
showing Taylor Swift standing next to them was posted in various places on the internet.
       Commenters on the photo debated whether it was the real Taylor Swift or an impersonator.
Either way, given her famous feud with Kanye West, it ‘s kinda funny.             
     

The Power of Taylor Compels You

A TAYLOR SWIFT FAN’S COUNTERQUOTE:

“THE POWER OF Taylor COMPELS YOU” 
      
A Photoshopped version of the Kanye graffiti a Taylor Swift fan posted on her blog, with the comment “Fixed it.”

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August 12, 2021

The fine lines between stupid, clever – and various other things...


SPINAL TAP’S “SMELL THE GLOVE” PRINCIPLE:

“It’s such a fine line between stupid…and clever.”
       The legendary saying from the mockumentary This is Spinal Tap (1984) 
       This “quote” actually combines parts of consecutive lines spoken by two characters in the movie: Spinal Tap’s lead singer and rhythm guitarist, David St. Hubbins (played by Michael McKean) and the band’s bass player, Derek Smalls (Harry Shearer).
       In the scene, the band members and their manager Ian Faith (Tony Hendra) are discussing the fact that the latest Spinal Tap album, Smell the Glove, had been criticized as sexist and banned by major retailers for featuring a photo of a greased, naked woman on all fours wearing a dog collar around her neck. Meanwhile, the album of a rival musician, Duke Fame, was selling well even though it had photos of several naked women on the cover. Ian explains that Duke is shown tied down and the women are whipping him in his album cover photo. Thus, Duke is the “victim,” so it’s not sexist.
       Ian notes: “If we had all you guys tied up, that probably would have been fine...But it’s still a stupid cover.”
       David muses: “It’s such a fine line between stupid and...”
       Derek finishes the thought and creates the famed “quote” by adding: “And clever.”
       David agrees: “Yeah, and clever.” 
       And, thus, the legendary saying was born.


THE CONGRESSIONAL VARIATION:

“There’s a fine line between irony and hypocrisy. I’m not sure our political leaders in Congress understand either one. But at least that makes for some fine comedy!” 
       From a July 31, 2014 post on The Center for Justice & Democracy’s PopTort.com site 
       The post was about the news that the U.S. House of Representatives had passed a resolution authorizing Speaker John Boehner to sue President Obama for what Republicans say has been inadequate enforcement of “Obamacare” – the health care program they oppose.
       (Cartoon by Steve Sack, political cartoonist for the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.)


THE CLIVEN BUNDY VARIATION:

“There’s a fine line between a folk hero and a scofflaw.”  
       Editorial by the Nashua Telegraph, April 25, 2014
       Commenting on Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy, who had about “15 minutes of fame” for publicly thumbing his nose at federal laws and regulations regarding grazing of private cattle herds on public lands and refusing to pay the fees required to use those lands.
       (Cartoon by Milt Priggee.)


ERMA’S OBSERVATION:

“There is a thin line that separates laughter and pain, comedy and tragedy, humor and hurt…How do you know laughter if there is no pain to compare it with?”
       Erma Bombeck (1927-1996)
       American humorist, newspaper columnist and author 
       From her book If Life Is a Bowl of Cherries, What Am I Doing in the Pits? (1985)


BLANCHE’S OBSERVATION:

“There is a fine line between having a good time and being a wanton slut.”
       Actress Rue McClanahan (1934-2010) as the character Blanche Devereaux
       In an episode of the TV series The Golden Girls


THE FISHING VERSION:

“There’s a fine line between fishing and standing on the shore like an idiot.”
       Steven Wright
       American comedian
       A widely-repeated joke Wright used in his stand-up comedy routine in the early 1990s. It now appears on posters, t-shirts and other items and hundreds of Internet graphics and posts.


THE GARDENING VERSION:

“There’s a fine line between gardening and madness.”
       Actor John Ratzenberger, as the character Cliff Clavin
       In an episode of the TV series Cheers 
       This one is for my wife Barbara Jo, a certified Master Gardener who spends much of her time maintaining the amazing subtropical botanical garden she created in our front and back yards – and for all those other avid gardeners out there who will understand why the joke is funny.

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August 4, 2021

“The opera ain’t over till the fat lady sings.”


THE FAMOUS SPORTS QUOTATION:

“The opera ain’t over till the fat lady sings.”
      
Dan Cook (1926-2008)
       San Antonio sports journalist and broadcaster
       Cook is widely credited as the person who popularized this saying, though he probably didn’t coin it. According to a June 3, 1978 article in the Washington Post (cited by many sources
), Cook first used it in his regular sports column in the San Antonio Express-News around 1975 or 1976.
       In 1978, he said it during a sports show on San Antonio’s KENS-TV, while discussing the Washington Bullets basketball team. Bullets coach Dick Motta heard Cook say it and started using the line himself when talking about his team’s odds of winning the NBA championship that year. It soon became a popular slogan among Bullets fans. When the Bullets won the championship on July 7, 1978, Motta crowed: “The Fat Lady is singing.” Dan Cook later said that the lady he envisioned was an iconic, hefty female opera singer, the popular image many people have of characters like
Brunnhilde in Richard Wagner’s Götterdämmerung).
       The opera version of the saying may have been inspired by an earlier one used by African-Americans in the southern United States:
“Church ain’t out till the fat lady sings” (a humorous reference to the sometimes plump ladies who sang hymns at church services).



THE TWINKIE OFFENSE:


“The fat lady – the one who apparently ate too many 150-calorie, nutrition-free Twinkies – has sung...Hostess announced early this morning that it would ‘promptly’ liquidate the company immediately and lay off its nearly 19,000 workers. The trigger was a strike this month by members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union. ‘We deeply regret the necessity of today's decision," Hostess said in a statement, "but we don't have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike.’”

      
David A. Kaplan 
       American journalist
       In a CNN/Fortune article about the news that Hostess Brands, maker of Wonder Bread, Ding Dongs, Ho Hos, and Twinkies, the “Golden Sponge Cake with Creamy Filling,” was planning to shut down due to financial woes and placing the blame on its union workers.


THE FEDERAL DEBT DEBATE VARIATION:
“It isn’t over until the Tea Party squeals.”
     
Taylor Marsh
 
       Political analyst and blogger 
       A comment in a post
on her blog about the debate over America’s federal debt problem and the reluctance of Republican conservatives to increase taxes as part of the solution.

THE FRENCH BIKE RACE VARIATION:

“[The] Tour de France...has been marred for years by performance-enhancing drug scandals. Forget ‘it ain’t over till the fat lady sings.’ In this event, ‘it ain’t over till the urine-sample lab results come back.’”
       Greg Cote

       Sportswriter for the Miami Herald
       A quip about illegal “doping” by professional bike racers, in a sidebar of his sports column in July 2011



THE JAPANESE BASEBALL VERSION:

“When the game is over, a fat lady will sing to us!” 
       A Japanese interpreter’s translation of the famed saying, as shown in subtitles, in the movie
Mr. Baseball (1992)


THE LAST RITES VERSION:

“It ain’t over till the fat priest reads extreme unction over your almost corpse. Oh, I forgot, the correct term has been changed from ‘extreme unction.’ Now it has been watered down to something like ‘anointing of the sick.’ God forbid that anyone might imply that the poor soul might actually be dying.”
      
David Skibbins
       American novelist and psychotherapist 
       Lines spoken by a character in Skibbins’ mystery novel The Hanged Man (2008)
       The quip refers to the Vatican II edicts issued by Pope Paul VI in 1965, which changed the name of the last rites Catholic priests give to dying people from the traditional phrase “Extreme Unction” to the nicer-sounding modern version,
“Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick.”

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July 9, 2021

Who finishes first: nice guys or Heather Locklear?


FAMOUS SPORTS CATCHPHRASE:

“Nice guys finish last.”
       Leo Durocher (1906-1991)
       Baseball player and manager             
       This catchphrase is traditionally attributed to Durocher, based on
remarks he made to reporters about the New York Giants on July 6, 1946 while he was managing the Brooklyn Dodgers. He later used it as the title of his autobiography. However, it’s not clear that he said those exact words 1946. For the backstory on this famous quotation see the post on my ThisDayinQuotes.com site at this link.


GIRLS GONE WILD VARIATION:

“Fast girls finish first, and bad girls finish often.” 
       Novelist Annette Blair 
             
       A line from her book Sex and the Psychic Witch (2007)


MELROSE PLACE CONFIRMATION:

Allison (actress Courtney Thorne-Smith ): “Amanda may be a mean, self-serving, ultra-bitch, but she was right about one thing. Nice guys do finish last in this world. Or hadn’t you heard?”
       From the Melrose Place TV series
       In the episode “To Live & Die in Malibu” (Season 3, Episode 24. First aired on March 25, 1995.) 
       The character Amanda Woodward was speaking of was played by Heather Locklear


SPONGEBOB COUNTERQUOTE:

SpongeBob SquarePants: “You used me...That wasn’t nice.” 
Plankton:
“Haven’t you figured it out, SpongeBob? Nice guys finish last. Only aggressive people conquer the world.” 
SpongeBob: “Well, what about aggressively nice people?”
       From the SpongeBob SquarePants TV series
       In the episode
"Texas/Walking Small" (Season 1, Episode 18, first aired on March 22, 2000)


NICHE MARKETING VERSION:

“Niche Guys Finish First.”
       Journalist John H. Taylor (1944-2015)
       Title of an article he wrote for Forbes, Oct. 26, 1992 
       


MARKETING GONE WILD VERSION:

“Unregulated international competition appears quite destructive and potentially threatening to our social economy. ‘Good guys finish last’ is a very real scenario in a world pregnant with standards-leveling competition, mobile capital, and billions of low-wage workers eager to get in on the action.” 
       Social economist Edward J. O’Boyle
       In his book Social Economics (1996)

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